Long Term Effects of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome in Adults
FASD Okanagan Assessment & Support Society

assessment And diagnosis

We use the “Canadian Standards of FASD Diagnosis” to assess and confirm a diagnosis of FASD. The assessment time process can be lengthy because of the many conversations held between the patient and the physician as well as attending appointments when patients are referred to other professionals to provide input. The patient will be assessed by a neuropsychologist as well as the physician. The patient and caregivers are included in the process.


After the assessment, the client is provided a complete report featuring the client’s strengths, and additional interventions for medical, education, employment, justice, psycho-social, and daily living recommendations are presented. An abridged copy of the final report is provided to the client for easy reference.

The report is shared with the client and their support team through an interactive process.

Assessments for the Indigenous community support the development of the Truth and Reconciliation Report, #33 and 34.
Assessments are often completed in areas that provide easier access for the patients: inside an Indigenous health facility, or inside justice institutions.


We also provide expert consultation during legal court appearances.

Symptoms of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome | Adults with FASD

What FASD Okanagan Does

We work with youth over 15 years of age and adults across all cultural sectors, gender and social status. We also complete assessments for individuals who are in need of a diagnosis for support with decision making in the criminal justice system.

Making a Referral

Anyone can make a referral for an assessment – self-referrals, family members, support professionals, and lawyers. Individuals do NOT need a referral from a family doctor.
The assessment process begins with a conversation with the clinic coordinator. Referral forms are completed and the research part of the assessment starts. While the research happens, patients have their hearing assessed by “Connect Hearing”, vision is assessed and blood work needs to be done. The clinic doctor will provide the referral for the blood work.

The assessment is strength focused and includes a full-body diagnosis. The patient is provided a complete report focusing on strengths, recommendations for medical interventions, educational, employment, justice, psycho-social, and daily living recommendations. We assist the patient to make applications for Disability, PWD, and for those eligible, CLBC. This report is presented to the patient and their support network.

The psychologist does an assessment to better understand how the patient processes information, what level of academic skills are at, and a determination of strengths the patient has. The physician then conducts several meetings with the patient and someone who knows the patient well -e.g. a caregiver, parent, or family member.

If needed, an occupational therapist will do an assessment to help better understand memory, muscle, and coordination issues. A final report is submitted to the Clinic Coordinator who presents the information to the patient and their support community as needed.

We also provide assessments and expert witness work for the justice community. This includes doing assessments for those incarcerated.

What FASD Okanagan Does

We work with youth over 15 years of age and adults across all cultural sectors, gender and social status. We also complete assessments for individuals who are in need of a diagnosis for support with decision making in the criminal justice system.

Making a Referral

Anyone can make a referral for an assessment – self-referrals, family members, support professionals, and lawyers. Individuals do NOT need a referral from a family doctor.
The assessment process begins with a conversation with the clinic coordinator. Referral forms are completed and the research part of the assessment starts. While the research happens, patients have their hearing assessed by “Connect Hearing”, vision is assessed and blood work needs to be done. The clinic doctor will provide the referral for the blood work.

The assessment is strength focused and includes a full-body diagnosis. The patient is provided a complete report focusing on strengths, recommendations for medical interventions, educational, employment, justice, psycho-social, and daily living recommendations. We assist the patient to make applications for Disability, PWD, and for those eligible, CLBC. This report is presented to the patient and their support network.

The psychologist does an assessment to better understand how the patient processes information, what level of academic skills are at, and a determination of strengths the patient has. The physician then conducts several meetings with the patient and someone who knows the patient well -e.g. a caregiver, parent, or family member.

If needed, an occupational therapist will do an assessment to help better understand memory, muscle, and coordination issues. A final report is submitted to the Clinic Coordinator who presents the information to the patient and their support community as needed.

We also provide assessments and expert witness work for the justice community. This includes doing assessments for those incarcerated.

Why Should I Get a Diagnosis?

Referrals can be made by calling the Clinic Coordinator directly at 250-938-5022.

Bernadette Letter

With the help and shared vision from Laura Hockman, ED of Independent Living Vernon, and her staff; the only adult assessment clinic in BC opened.

While being in the clinic, there are many accomplishments I am so very proud of. One that I cherish the most was having Dr. Densmore agree to be our lead assessment physician. He not only provided leadership and training for all of the staff, patients, and their families; his incredible regard was demonstrated in the relationship-building he approached each patient with. His tenacity and curiosity resulted in reports that were more than meaningful, they were life-saving, life-altering, and resulted in lives being changed for the long term. Dr. Densmore invested significant hours researching, writing, and driving to locations across the province to complete assessments often on his time. His infectious curiosity and passion to understand FASD changed the lives of all he worked with, including me.

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Important Notice!

FASD Okanagan Valley Assessment and Support Society wants to express heartfelt gratitude to Bernadette O’Donnell, our Executive Director, who has recently resigned as she moves into retirement. Bernadette championed our organization with unwavering dedication and commitment to individuals with FASD, parents or caregivers of individuals with FASD, and all our community organizations that we have collaborated with over the past six years. Your consistent hard work, passion, and advocacy for this community will never be forgotten. Thank you for all your hard years of work! We are forever grateful.Read More